Southern Phone and the DV Safe Phone Project

During the enforced stay at home and social distancing orders employed during COVID-19, many of us have been making the best out of our extra time spent at home. People have tried their hand at baking bread, started home improvement projects and spent some quality family time with the those they live with. But what if your home isn’t a safe place?

Unfortunately, victims of domestic violence have been finding themselves confined within their homes often alongside their abusers, causing a spike in instances of domestic violence. Since the first cases of Coronavirus were recorded in the state of New South Wales, Google searches for domestic violence increased by 75%, marking a worrying trend for those stuck in emotionally or physically abusive relationships.

DV hotlines have however seen a decrease in calls, indicating that victims are finding it difficult to reach the support services that they need.

CEO of the Red Rose Foundation Betty Taylor stated, “Often the mobile phone is the first thing to be destroyed, hacked or taken in a domestic violence situation which means a victim has no way of making that emergency call”.

The Creation of the DV Safe Phone Project

Ashton Wood of IC3 Solutions began the project after speaking to Janine Lee from Domestic Violence Business Solutions. After trying to donate some personal items, the need for working mobile phones was made clear to him. He rang his friend Patrick King, owner of King IT phone repair stores. They agreed to help with the process, wiping phones of personal details and checking their working condition.

Since then there have been other organisations coming onboard to help how they can, including Jeep Australia who have offered all 69 dealerships Australia-wide as phone drop-off locations and are covering the costs of getting the phones to DV Safe Phone for testing.

Southern Phone are very proud to announce our support for this cause. We are also delighted to announce that we have contributed 129 new working handsets to the DV Safe Phone project.

Why It’s Important

A second phone can really be the difference for a person in need in getting the help that they require. Betty Taylor says, “Having a second phone hidden away is an important part of a victim’s safety planning and provides them security and the ability to reach out for help.”

On average one woman is murdered per week by either a current or former partner in Australia. By donating your extra phone, you could save a life.

How You Can Help

To find out more information about the DV Safe Phone project, you can visit their website for more information. The Red Rose Foundation website also shares several useful resources, links, and support services for those effected.

If you have an old phone that you would like to contribute, please consider sending them to this very worthy cause. Sign out of all accounts on the device and either drop them into any King IT store in Queensland, any Jeep dealership in Australia or post them directly to Ashton Wood, PO Box 1440, Mooloolaba QLD 4557.

In Need of Support?

If you are a victim of domestic violence and are in need a second phone, it is best to contact the Red Rose Foundation directly. This can be done through the contact form on their website.

If you need to speak to someone urgently regarding domestic violence you can contact the DV connect hotline on 1800 811 811 (Australia Only). For more information visit www.dvsafephone.com.au/